Make a Personal Dictionary

Make a Personal Dictionary

ELL students need dictionaries. Learn how to make a personal dictionary with your students here! literacy | language | LA

One important tool that most ELLs need is a dual language picture dictionary.  Sometimes we have these in our schools but most of the time we may not.  Or if we do have great dictionaries they do not always have subject specific vocabulary.  Here is a great freebie that I have used with my new students.  When they encounter a new word they can add it along with a picture to their personal dictionary.  There is also space to put the word and the definition in their first language.  This will help the student make the links between their first language and their second language.

In this freebie is the ELL dictionary as well as a dictionary that can be use with the whole class.

Make a personal dictionary in the regular classroom.

I think it is important to include the resources embedded into regular programming.  This way you are not planning two separate lessons and preparing a second set of resources.   It is important for all student to learn subject specific vocabulary.  You can have all of your student keep track of the new vocabulary they are learning in their units through the use of this freebie.  Students may find it interesting to look up the word in another language that is important to them (family origin, second language).  Doing this will build respect for other languages as well as build links about how other language structures are similar to English. You can also use the last two pages of the freebie to have students look up synonyms instead of words in another language.

 

Accommodations for ELLs

Accommodations for ELLs

Sometimes it is easy to forget about the quiet student in the back corner of your classroom that has a little bit of English.  ELL students who have developed some oral proficiency in English may still need some support through accommodations in the classroom.

Accommodations for ELLs

Teachers must remember that it can take 5-7 years for ELL students to develop equivalent proficiency in English as their same language peers.  Therefore I find it important to keep a reminder in my planner of key ideas for how to accommodate my ELL students.  It is helpful when planning units or when I am working with other teachers on how to plan and accommodate ELL’s in the regular classroom.  It is a quick go to guide.

 

Graphic Organizers with ELL Students

Graphic Organizers with ELL Students

Using graphic organizers with ELL students is a great idea to help them visualize concepts. Click through for a free graphic organizer to start! | elementary | free | blank | science | templates

I find that using graphic organizers with ELL students are a great idea.  It seems that teaching students to infer is a big focus in many classrooms.  So the question is how do you update your graphic organizers so that ELLs can use them as well.

Using graphic organizers with ELL students is a great idea to help them visualize concepts. Click through for a free graphic organizer to start!

 My answer is to add pictures which gives clues as to what content goes into each area of the graphic organizer.  These pictures will help to cue the ELL to remember how to fill this out.  I have included the graphic organizer here for you.

To modify this further for beginner students you can add sentence frames or allow the student to write in their first language.

If you use this please leave me a comment and tell me how it worked!!

Match, Select and Name

One great reading strategy that I have used with ELD students (students who do not have first language literacy) is called Match, Select and Name.  This is based on a method used with special education students from the book Literacy Skill Development for Students with Special Learning Needs by Leslie Broun.

Match: Using picture cards, Word cards and Picture/Word cards the students begin by matching the Picture Cards with the Picture/Word Cards.
 The students learn the vocabulary by associating the word with the picture.  Next students match the Picture Word Cards with the Word cards.  Then the students match the Picture Cards with the Word Cards.

Select: Students can also hear the word then select the Picture Cards, Picture/Word cards or the Word Cards. They can also be shown one of the set of cards and select the match from another set of cards.

Name: Student use their oral language skills to tell others what cards they are using.  They can also look at the Picture/Word cards and identify the words that they know.  Each time they can try to identify more word cards.

Other Activities: Students can play memory with two sets of the cards against a peer. They can also use the cards to write sentences within a sentence frame.

Assessment: In a regular classroom environment using this strategy with subject specific vocabulary would be a good way to help to integrate these students into your regular classroom programming.  Working one on one with these students can occur during your guided reading time or at other times with the rest of your students are working independently.  Each activity should only take 5-10 minutes.  Assessment can occur during these times as you identify how many of the words the student knows.  You can easily assess the student growth by tracking how many words they learn over time.

Here is a school vocabulary kit.

Assessment and Evaluation for ELLs

As an ESL teacher questions always arise about ways to assess and evaluate ELL students.

Assessment and Evaluation for ELLs

Many ELL students require a varying degree of differentiation in the types of assessments they are given. Assessments must be fair, equitable and involve higher order thinking skills. It is the responsibility of teachers to have a variety of assessment procedures that benefit all students in the classroom. Although there is value in pencil paper tests often these tests are evaluating the students level of English, content knowledge, and content vocabulary. If using these tests, allow your ELLs to have a glossary of terms accessible to them while writing. Also, vary the types of questions in the test using the list below.

Throughout the newsletter strategies that are effective for ELLs are identified

As an ESL teacher questions always arise about ways to assess and evaluate ELL students.

Assessment and Evaluation for ELLs

Many ELL students require a varying degree of differentiation in the types of assessments they are given. Assessments must be fair, equitable and involve higher order thinking skills. It is the responsibility of teachers to have a variety of assessment procedures that benefit all students in the classroom. Although there is value in pencil paper tests often these tests are evaluating the students level of English, content knowledge, and content vocabulary. If using these tests, allow your ELLs to have a glossary of terms accessible to them while writing. Also, vary the types of questions in the test using the list below.

Throughout the newsletter strategies that are effective for ELLs are identified