Learning about Inquiry in part one of this video series.  Learn what a WonderWall is and how it is made and used in the classroom through this video series by Madly Learning. inquiry based learning | activities | projects | science | math | process | boardCreating a wonder wall is a great tool to use in inquiry to build a space where students can
  • get students thinking
  • share their learning throughout their inquiry
  • keep ideas concepts and questions visible
  • interact with others
  • share standards, learning goals, and assessment criteria
  • share evidence of learning

 

This post is part 1 in my inquiry series.  To learn more about inquiry click through to see my many other posts about inquiry.

Also why not connect and stay up to date on all things inquiry by joining my teaching with inquiry facebook group.  

 

What’s a Wonder Wall?

Wonder wall boards are built at the beginning of a unit and are kept alive throughout student learning.  These are living examples of student learning throughout the unit.

Wonder wall boards are built at the beginning of a unit and are kept alive throughout student learning.  These are living examples of student learning throughout the unit.

Building this board starts when you begin to provoke students thinking about the topic you are beginning to study. Students will look at artifacts and ask questions about what they are seeing.  They activate prior knowledge and share this with others in a knowledge building circle.

Type of Display Board

This is an example of the board that I use for my wonder wall.  It is a trifold board.  One side is for my fourth graders and the other side for my fifth graders.
Sometimes I use these trifold boards and other times I just use my bulletin boards but this is great if you are lacking wall space and it also works to move around the classroom for students to use when you are working with them.
Here are some of the wonder wall boards from my classroom

Artifacts

I use artifacts to help provoke conversations and interests in a topic at the beginning of a unit.  Artifacts can be many things

  • real objects
  • pictures
  • words
  • videos
  • stories
Most of the time I use pictures that I print out in colour. Especially if I don’t have access to real life objects.
If I have easily accessible artifacts like my rock collection or some small appliances from home I might use those as well.

The Role of Questions

To use a wonder wall at the beginning of an inquiry means that you provoke students thinking about a topic.  Providing them with artifacts that gets them thinking.

Having them ask questions is the next step.

Students will take sticky notes and ask questions about what they see.  Use these doodle notes in my resource library to help your students keep track of what they are thinking.

As students share thier background knowledge and their questions the board is built.  These questions are the driving force behind your learning.

Group their questions into themes, use them to develp learning goals and success criteria and to find gaps in their knowledge that may require a teacher directed lesson to fill.

Put student questions beside the artifact or picture on the wonder wall and throughout the learning strive to answer these questions and keep track of unanswered questions.

It is through student questions that learning is constructed.

Lessons Learned

Another thing I learned while implementing my wonder wall is that when students ask questions I really really want to answer them.  I want to share my knowledge and have them soak it all in and teach them something.  I am a teacher!! this is what I do!! I know stuff and teach about it!! STOP STOP STOP.  I had to get myself to stop!
This was not what inquiry was about.  Sure, I am a teacher, but I am not as powerful or as knowledgable as Google.  I mentally needed to stop myself and concentrate on not answering their questions but to ask them to add their questions to the Wonder Wall and allow them to figure out the answers for themselves.
I  knew that I was going to lead them through my lessons to these answers but I needed to stop just giving them the information.  They would now have to start working for this information because I was not going to give them an easy way out.
Sure later on in the unit, we would have a discussion on certain topics and I would explain different concepts to them.  BUT we did this together.  I was not teaching them I was facilitating their learning.
Giving them the tools to let them find the answers to their questions on their own.

Results

And you know what…a funny thing happened.
They started learning faster than I had expected.
They took those questions home and found out the answers to them.  They would read books during independent time and find the answers to our questions.  They were discussing these things with their parents at home.
 It was amazing to see how excited they were about learning these concepts which in turn also allowed our discussion at school to become more vibrant and engaging.
Sure there were times when a teacher directed lesson was necessary especially in the technical aspects of the units.  But overall it was great to see them apply their learning in new and interesting ways.
If you would like to see how I made my Wonder Wall for these units check out my Video below
I now include wonder wall cards in most of my units to help teachers get started with artifacts for students and teachers to use to use as a provocation to get started with the units that they are teaching.  If you are interested in the cards that were used for the wonder wall on the video you can get them in the two units below.
   
Learn more about inquiry.  Next up in my inquiry series